8 Mods That Don’t Belong On The Road

Modifying cars is an addictive hobby. It starts out with you claiming that you’re just going to be lowering it, and maybe buying some new wheels. Then by the end of it, you’ve got a full time attack-spec monster that is barely functional on the road any more.

As much as we appreciate how wild these cars are, here are the mods that we think should stay in the race cars that they were first seen in.

Bucket Seats

Bucket seats do a very important job. They keep you firmly in place right when you’re on the last limits of grip. Carbon fiber fixed examples are perfect if you are heading onto the  Nurburgring in pursuit of a sub-eight minute lap, but on a day-to-day basis, they can be unbearable to live with.

Every bump is felt, and if you have wrap around seats, visibility is an absolute nightmare. Some bucket seats can be very comfortable, and possibly good enough to  live with on a daily basis, but unless you are going to be getting some serious track time in, OEM is the way to go.

Performance Clutch

A performance clutch is a great way to improve the shifts of your car. You’ll be able to smash through the gears without worrying about whether or not your clutch will hold up to the abuse.

On the other hand, a performance clutch can be the bane of your existence when being used on the road. They’re much heavier to deal with, and in traffic, can give you more of a workout than leg day. Unless you are going to be running a full time racer, you’re better off sticking with a less aggressive road clutch.

Loud Exhausts

A loud exhaust is on the list of nearly every petrolhead’s wants. To be able to hear your engine screaming through the gears is truly unrivalled, and it’s a glorious moment when a tunnel comes into sight.

The compromise of a loud exhaust though, is that most of the time, drone occurs at constant high revs. This is especially bad on the motorway, and can make your journey an absolute hell.  Nothing you try to do will drown out the constant whirr of the exhaust either, so if you decide to do it, just be prepared for a loud experience. An exhaust with a switchable valve system is the perfect medium between loud and quiet, and lets you choose what volume you want, at any given time.

Wide Tyres

One of the first mods that you should consider when modifying your car to be quicker, is better tyres. But understand that ‘wider’ isn’t always ‘better’.

Wider tyres let your car contact more of the road. That’s a good thing right? Well yes, if you are going flat out around Eau Rouge and you need  335 section tyres just to keep you from spinning off the track. If you are in a road car however, wider tyres get tugged and pulled all over the place simply by the contours in the road. This can be frustrating, as you are constantly having to make corrections to the steering wheel and stop it from veering to one side.

One of the first mods that you should consider when modifying your car to be quicker, is better tyres. But understand that ‘wider’ isn’t always ‘better’.

Wider tyres let your car contact more of the road. That’s a good thing right? Well yes, if you are going flat out around Eau Rouge and you need  335 section tyres just to keep you from spinning off the track. If you are in a road car however, wider tyres get tugged and pulled all over the place simply by the contours in the road. This can be frustrating, as you are constantly having to make corrections to the steering wheel and stop it from veering to one side.

Huge Wings

Aerodynamics have seen a complete change in recent years. Nearly any car can be made to look like downforce monsters by adding parts all over that help push it into the ground. This means that boxy daily drivers are sometimes seen festooned in wings so big that you might mistake it for a Chaparral 2F.

Not only are these wings an eyesore, but they also block rear vision for the driver. A massive metal bar crossing your rear window is not the ideal thing to be looking at when you are backing up. This coupled to the fact that these wings are rarely set up correctly, makes for a mod that should really be kept on the track.

Stripped Interior

In a race car, every millisecond counts. If a simple gram can be shed, it’s scrapped in an instant. This is the simple reason why you see track ready cars with nothing but the bare essentials in the cockpit.

This isn’t the best idea to replicate in a daily driven car, simply because of noise and comfort. Manufacturers spend millions of dollars on each car, making sure that every noise and squeak is silenced so that you can drive in peace. By stripping the interior, you render this useless, and bring all that noise back into the cabin. It’s a great mod for those looking to cut time off their laps, but just know that there is a consequence if you do – and your B-road blasts probably won’t be perceptibly faster for your troubles.

Welded Differential

You may not find a welded differential in an F1 or BTCC car, but competition drift cars have been running them for years. A welded differential effectively stops the wheels from being able to spin at different rates, and therefore helps to keep drifts going without a one tyre fire occurring.

Most people don’t realise that the problem with a welded diff though, is that the wheels  always spin at the same speed, no matter what. This means that when you are in tight spaces, trying to manoeuvre around, the wheel going slower will have to hop and judder in order to keep up. Many get used to this and don’t have a problem with it, but for comfort’s sake, pay the extra money for a Limited Slip Differential instead.

Roll Cage

A  roll cage is a great safety addition to any car. It provides you piece of mind that if you manage to flip your car, there’s a higher chance that you’ll be walking away from it. Some racing series involving street cars require a full cage, which is completely understandable, as cars on track are going a lot quicker than on the road.

However, at the same time, roll cages can be an absolute nuisance on a day to day basis. They tend to be in the exact place you are trying to look, and block parts of your blind spots. This can be infuriating, and if you are in a convertible, they destroy the open top ambience that you likely bought the car to enjoy. If you plan on taking the car to the track, be sure to install one, but if you are just doing it for show, know that it’s a feature that you’ll quickly grow tired of.

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