World’s Largest Yachts

There are big yachts, and then there are megayachts. Check out the top 10 largest luxury yachts in the world.

10. Rising Sun

Rising Sun

Rising Sun: 452′ LOA

Courtesy Lürssen

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Everyone loves a good rivalry story. In the case of the 452-foot Rising Sun, launched in 2004, her story is about Oracle CEO Larry Ellison and Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. These guys have been competing for years. When Allen ordered the 416-foot superyacht Octopus from the Lürsson yard in Germany, Ellison then placed an order for the 452-foot Rising Sun, which became the second-largest private yacht when he extended the hull from 387 feet during construction.

9. Al Salamah

Al Salamah

Al Salamah: 457′ LOA

Courtesy Lürssen

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Coming in at number 9 is another Lürssen build, the 457-foot Al SalamahAl Salamah was delivered in 1999 and then returned to Lürssen in 2007 for a refit. She is reportedly owned by Prince Sultan bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia.

8. Yas

Yas

Yas: 462’7″ LOA

Courtesy Royal Netherlands Navy

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Yas was launched by the shipyard Abu Dhabi MAR in 2011 and measures 462 feet, 7 inches. Yas is a complete rebuild of a 1978 steel-hulled navy frigate of the Royal Netherlands Navy.

7. El Horriya

El Horriya

El Horriya: 478′ LOA

Frederick K. Larkin via Flikr

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The oldest yacht in our top 10 list by far, the 478-foot El Horriya was originally built in 1865 as a royal yacht for the Khedive of Egypt. In her many years El Horriyahas had a number of refits, including two extensions. She is now under the care of the Egyptian Navy but seldom sailed in her role as Presidential Yacht.

6. Prince Abdulaziz

Prince Abdulaziz

Prince Abdulaziz: 482’4″

Courtesy Helsingør Værft

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Danish yard Helsingør Værft built Prince Abdulaziz in 1984 for the Saudi royal family. At 482 feet 4 inches, Prince Abdulaziz comes in as the 6th largest luxury yacht in the world and reportedly includes a mosque, movie theater and a fully equipped hospital.

5. Topaz

Topaz

Topaz: 483’2″ LOA

Courtesy Lürssen

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Lürssen sure keeps busy building massive superyachts. Just 10 inches longer than Prince AbdulazizTopaz comes in at number 5 with a length overall of 483 feet 2 inches.

4. Al Said

Al Said

Al Said: 508’6″ LOA

Courtesy Lürssen

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In case you didn’t notice, she has a helipad. And what you can’t see? Accommodations for 65 guests (plus a reported crew of 150), a movie theater and a concert hall for when your favorite orchestra swings by for a visit. Number 4 on the list of world’s largest luxury yachts is Al Saïd, yet another build by Lürssen. Al Saïd measures 508 feet 6 inches and was launched in 2008.

3. Dubai

Dubai

Dubai: 531’6″ LOA

Courtesy Blohm + Voss

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Dubai comes in at number three with a length overall of 531 feet 6 inches. Dubai, which has also gone by the names Platinum, Panhandle and Golden Star, got off to a slow start. Originally commissioned in 1996, the yacht was started by a partnership between Blohm + Voss and Lürssen but production was stalled for a number of years. She was finished in 2006 by Platinum Yachts after being bought by the government of Dubai, hence the new name. Among her many water toys, Dubai reportedly carries her own submarine.

2. Eclipse

Eclipse

Eclipse: 536′ LOA

Moshi Anahory via Flikr

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Blohm + Voss build Eclipse held the title of world’s largest luxury yacht from her launch in 2010 until April of 2013. She is 536 feet in length and has a top speed of 22 knots.

1. Azzam

Azzam

Azzam: 590’7″ LOA

Courtesy Lürssen

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At an astounding 590 feet 7 inches, Azzam overtook Eclipse as the world’s largest superyacht in April of 2013. With a total horsepower of 94,000, Azzam reportedly hit over 31 knots on her sea trials in the North Sea. The main salon alone is 95 feet long by 59 feet wide, with an open layout and no pillars. Azzam was built by Lürssen Yachts for an estimated 600 million dollars. The owner is believed to be Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the President of the United Arab Emirates.

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MANSORY Rolls-Royce Ghost – Blue / Gold

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Based on the Rolls-Royce Ghost concept, MANSORY presents one of the three limited luxury-car specimens. Subtle modifications designed to increase the car’s elegance and add a touch of sportiness are priorities. The latter especially, is achieved by adapting the engine-electronic in an impressive manner, which results in increased overall performance. A unique overall concept with exclusive features emerges.

Sophisticated elegance characterizes the White Ghost’s Limited image. The name ties into the theme here: MANSORY wraps the Rolls-Royce’s silhouette in a subtle white hue. It accents the car’s body style as well as its understated upgrades in an optimal and stylish manner. The new front-end featuring additional LED daytime running lights and vertical air outlets on the sides, directly beneath the serial cooling grill are distinct eye-catchers. This is in perfect harmony with MANSORY’s side skirts, the rear view mirrors on each side, the rear spoiler as well as the rear apron with implied diffuser and dual sport-exhaust-system.

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World’s fastest go-kart reaches 0-60mph in 1.5 seconds

The world’s fastest go-kart, the C5 Blast Go-Kart Ultimate, is claiming a 0-60mph (97km/h) time of just 1.5-seconds, making it nearly twice as fast as the most potent Tesla Model S.

Canadian kart maker Daymak claim to have made an electric kart that can accelerate quicker than an F1 car.

You have to get through Canadian winters somehow, and Toronto-based kart manufacturer Daymak clearly spend theirs pushing the boundaries of how fast they can make a go kart, er, go.

Enter the firm’s new C5 Blast Go-Kart Ultimate. Daymak are claiming an astonishing 0-60mph time for the kart of just 1.5 seconds – that’s quicker than a MotoGP bike, F1 car or rallycross supercar. Now imagine all that acceleration with your bum hanging mere millimetres off the tarmac…

The kart is packing full 12 EDF – or Electric Ducted Fan – motors, with eight located on either side of the driver, and four behind, making it look like an angry, protective peacock.

The price? Well, the C5 Blast Go-Kart Ultimate will set you back $60,000 in Canadian Dollars – about £34,000 – which does sound a lot for a kart. But then again, we doubt you could find a machine that will let you go faster for less, right?

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“Speed will not be an issue, and we think we can eventually go under one-second 0-to-60mph, making it faster than any vehicle in existence,” said Aldo Baiocchi, President of Daymak.

Each go-kart is custom built and tested, with delivery taking 60 days after purchase.

The wines you CAN drink on a diet!

Good news for slimmers: budget supermarket Aldi has launched a new range of low-calorie wines that contain as little as 55 calories a glass.

The new collection – called  ‘Featherweight’ – features bottles with only half the calories and a lower alcohol percentage than regular wines.

The diet tipples are available in red, white, and rosé, and varieties include favourites such as Sauvignon Blanc and Merlot.

The Featherweight Collection by Aldi features wines that have half the calories of regular tipples. Included are two whites, a rosé and a red

The Featherweight Collection by Aldi features wines that have half the calories of regular tipples. Included are two whites, a rosé and a red

The four bottles in the range all cost £2.99 and have an alcohol percentage of 5.5, making it less than half as strong as typical wines, which typically have a percentage of 11.6.

The range includes a Sauvignon Blanc, an Italian Pinot Grigio, a Merlot, and a White Zinfandel.

A 125ml glass of Aldi’s Featherweight Pinot Grigio contains just 55 calories, while a standard glass has double at 104.

The lighter White Zinfandel has 57 calories in a 125ml glass compared with a standard Zinfandel which has 113.

The White Zinfandel and Sauvignon Blanc are only available in certain regions.

Both can be bought in Swindon, Bathgate, Chelmsford, Neston, and Goldthorpe

The White Zinfandel and Sauvignon Blanc are only available in certain regions. Both can be bought in Swindon, Bathgate, Chelmsford, Neston, and Goldthorpe

 

The Merlot is available nationwide

The Pinot Grigio is only available in Atherstone, Bolton, Darlington and Cardiff

The Merlot is available nationwide, while the Pinot Grigio is only available in Atherstone, Bolton, Darlington and Cardiff

Aldi’s Featherweight Sauvignon Blanc meanwhile has 55 calories while the Merlot has 59.

However there is a small catch.

Only the Merlot is available nationwide, while the others are only available at certain regional locations.

The Sauvignon Blanc and White Zinfandel are only available in Swindon, Bathgate, Chelmsford, Neston, and Goldthorpe; while the Pinot Grigio can only be bought in Atherstone, Bolton, Darlington and Cardiff.

Tony Baines, joint managing director of corporate buying at Aldi UK, said: ‘We have seen over the last year a real appetite from wine drinkers in the UK for lower calorie and ABV wines to moderate their alcohol intake.

‘We ensure we’re offering our customers the products they want and so have introduced our Featherweight wines as a lighter choice for our shoppers.

  • All the tipples cost £2.99 but some are only available in certain parts of the UK 

10 Most Expensive Cars For 2017

Photo credit: Maksim Toome / Shutterstock

Though they all ride on four tires and are operated in the usual manner, they’re not cars in the strictest sense. Rather, they’re rolling works of fine art that push the limits of vehicular performance, though only a smattering of humans will ever get the chance to actually see any of them in person, let alone drive one.

They’re among the rarest rides on the road and guarantee the kind of extreme exclusivity that not even the costliest Mercedes and BMWs could hope to approach. They’re true supercars, priced without reason, with price tags that well exceed the sacrosanct $1 million mark. That’s beyond the reach of mere mega-lottery winners and professional athletes, requiring pockets as deep as Scrooge McDuck and a garage the size of a warehouse to hold the rest of what’s almost certainly a fleet of equally matchless vehicular playthings.

And that’s assuming that even with all the money in the world, one might be fortunate enough to obtain one of what’s typically a tightly limited – and highly coveted – production run.

We’re featuring 10 of the costliest – and also, by the way, the quickest and most beautiful – rides in the world

Apollo

10. Apollo Arrow – $1,100,000

Coming from fledgling German exotic car maker Apollo Automobil, the mid-engine Arrow was unveiled at the 2016 Geneva MotorShow alongside the more affordable ($800K) Apollo N. The sharply creased Arrow makes its point with a 4.2-liter twin-turbo V8 engine sourced from Audi that produces an estimated 1,000 horsepower and is said to help the car hit 60 mph in just 2.9 seconds. Only around 100 are expected to be built.

Mazzanti

9. Mazzanti Evantra Millecavalli – $1,200,000

With a slim production run of 25 units expected, this carbon fiber hypercoupe replaces the Evantra in the Italian automaker’s lineup and packs a wallop with a 7.0-liter twin-turbo V8 that’s rated at 1,000 horsepower. It’s claimed to take the low-slung coupe to 60 mph in a sudden 2.7 seconds and reach a felonious top speed of 250 mph.

Ferrari

8. Ferrari LaFerrari Aptera – $1,400,000

With only 200 planned, this is an open-top version of the luscious LaFerrari hybrid sportscar. It’s powered by a 6.3-liter V12 gasoline engine and a 120 kW electric motor that combine to produce the equivalent of 950 raging horsepower. That’s good for a 0-60 mph run in under 3 seconds and a top speed estimated at 217 mph.

ARASH

7. Arash AF10 Hybrid – $1,500,000

This hybrid-powered supercar comes from a low-volume English supercar-maker and is built with extensive use of lightweight carbon fiber. The AF10 Hybrid enhances a 550-horsepower 6.2-liter gasoline V8 engine with no fewer than four electric motors in what the automaker calls a “Warp Drive” configuration to achieve a staggering 2,080 horsepower and achieve an estimated 2.8-second leap to 60 mph. A bona fide racing version with a fire extinguisher, roll cage, and intercom costs an extra $100 grand.

Zenvo

6. Zenvo TS1 – $1,800,000

Coming from a little-known Danish supercar builder, the TS1 was revealed at last year’s Geneva Motor Show as the successor to the brand’s ST1, bolstered with assorted performance enhancements that include a new 5.9-liter V8 with twin superchargers, an estimated 1,100 horsepower, and a top speed of 233 mph. Production is limited to 15 units.

Koenigsegg

5. Koenigsegg Regera – $1,900,000

The name translates into English as to “reign” or”rule,” and the Regera indeed rules the road with a 5.0-liter twin-turbo V8 gasoline engine that’s augmented by three electric motors and puts a combined output of 1,822 horsepower to the pavement. Only 80 units are planned to be built by this Swedish exotic car builder.

Bugatti

4. Bugatti Chiron – $2,700,000

Bugatti follows up the coveted Veyron 16.4 with the dramatically sculpted Chiron. It’s powered by an updated version of the automaker’s 8.0-liter W16 engine (it’s like two V8s joined at the crankshaft) that nets a truly illegal 1,500 horsepower and can propel the two-seater to 60 mph in a scenery-blurring 2.5 seconds.

Pagani

3. Pagani Huayra BC – $2,800,000

Lighter in weight, and with a wider track and more aerodynamic styling than the Huayra upon which its based, it’s named after well-known car collector Benny Caiola (the “BC”). It packs a Mercedes-Benz AMG-supplied 6.0-liter twin-turbo V12 engine with an estimated 750 horsepower. Only 20 units are expected to be built.

W Motors

2. Lykan Hypersport – $3,400,000

Only seven units of the so-called “first Arab supercar” from Dubai’s W Motors are expected to be built, with the first one having already been delivered to the Abu Dhabi police as what could be the speediest cop car on the planet with 780 horsepower under the hood. Aside from a truly quick and attractive supercar, $3.4 million gets you LED headlamps encrusted with 220 diamonds (or other precious stone of one’s choosing) each, among other over-the-top accoutrements. A less-expensive model (at $1.85 million), the Fenyr Supersport, is also available.

Aston Martin

1. Aston Martin MA-RB 00 – $3,900,000

This street-legal racer is slated for the 2018 model year and was developed in conjunction with Red Bull Racing. It will ride on a lightweight carbon fiber structure and come powered by a new V12 engine, with production limited to between 99 and 150 road cars and 25 track-only versions.

 

Ask yourself, Are you smarter than a pigeon?

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Before you answer “Yes!” — look at these three quick scenarios. And if you find out you’re a bit bird-brained, remember: intelligence is all relative, says psychologist Ben Ambridge.

What makes humans special? What makes us different from animals? After reviewing many studies of both humans and animals, my conclusion is: less than you might think. While we may not choose to call them civilizations, many animals — from chimpanzees to chickens — live in groups with a clearly defined pecking order and display many kinds of abilities. Ants and bees will give you a good run for your money on tests of route-planning and puzzle-solving; starlings “make music” in that their songs are constructed around the same scales as most traditional Western compositions, and abstract thinking is shown by crows, squirrels and box turtles in tests that involve using patterns or rational inferences to figure out the location of a tasty treat. Whether or not other animals can learn human language is a long-running debate, but many — dogs in particular — can learn an impressive number of individual words. And while it might be a stretch to call it science and engineering, chimpanzees are one of a number of animals who can use tools: they’ve figured out how to ant-dip (use a shoot as a spoon to pick up ants) and termite-fish (use a thin twig as a rod to catch termites).

Of course, nobody is denying that humans can do plenty of things that other animals can’t. All I hope to persuade you is that, in the words of Charles Darwin, the difference is “one of degree and not of kind”: the same abilities that allow starlings to sing, parrots to count and fish to find their way home allow humans to write symphonies, do calculus and invent Google Maps. We don’t do anything different from other animals; we do the same things, only better. While the below tests might sound a little frivolous, they have a firm scientific basis and they’re based on peer-reviewed articles from reputable academic journals. By exploring the similarities and differences between humans and other animals, we can begin to understand when and how our abilities, our likes and dislikes, and even our foibles and mental blind spots arose in the course of evolution. Now get set to pit yourself against a pigeon in three short scenarios. After answering all them, you’ll see the answers.

Scenario #1: Two many phones!

You’ve just saved up to buy a fancy new phone, and you had to really put in the hours in a part-time job (which you hate) but it was worth it. You place your order online, and the phone arrives first thing in the morning. That afternoon, an identical phone arrives. You contact the company, and — after keeping you on hold for an hour and failing to phone you back twice — a representative says the system can’t process a return and, in fact, you’d be doing the call center a favor if you just kept the phone. You agree and decide to treat your brother, whose birthday is coming up and whose current phone is all but unusable. But which of the two still-shrink-wrapped phones do you give him?

  1. The first one
  2. The second one

Scenario #2: Band-aid, please

Three months ago you bought a $190 ticket to see one of your favorite bands. Then yesterday, your #1 favorite band announced a new tour, and you snapped up a $125 ticket. In your excitement, you forgot to check the dates and — you guessed it — the shows are on the same night. You can’t sell either ticket: both bands are so obscure that their gigs never sell out, and everyone you know hates them. Which do you attend?

  1. The £150 gig
  2. The £95   gig

Scenario #3: Don’t be a mug

You want to buy some cool vintage coffee mugs and the more mugs the better (you hate washing up and have big cupboards). You go to a flea market. One seller has a box of 20 mugs, though three have nasty chips and two are missing handles. Another seller is offering, for the same price, a box of 12 intact mugs. You can’t buy both because — oh, I don’t know — the two sellers hate each other and each won’t deal with you if you’ve bought off the other. From whom do you buy your mugs?

  1. First seller
  2. Second seller

Answer #1: Two many phones

Well, there are no right or wrong answers here; the whole point is that it makes no difference. But, if this happened for real, I bet you’d give your brother the second free one, wouldn’t you? If so, you are showing a justification of effort effect: you value things that you have to work hard for much more than (identical) things that come cheap or for free. But in cases such as this one, this is a logical fallacy: it makes absolutely no difference which phone you give away and which you keep.

Pigeons show the same fallacy. Take pigeons that are trained to know both a red key and a green key give two seconds of access to grain when pecked. The clever part is that, in order to access the red key, the pigeons need to give one peck on a white key; but in order to access the green key, they need to give twenty pecks on the white key. Finally, pigeons are given a free choice — without needing to peck on the white key at all — between the red and green key. Which key do they prefer? Yes, the one that they usually had to work hard to get, even though, just as with the two phones, the results are exactly the same, two seconds of access to grain.

Answer #2: Band-aid, please

This time, there is a right answer: you should just go and see your favorite band. If you decide to go to see the other band, you are showing a sunk cost effect. Having already sunk a lot of money into the ticket, you can’t bear to waste it. Again, this is a fallacy. The past is gone forever whatever you do, so just go to the gig you’ll prefer.

Again pigeons (and also starlings) show the same fallacy. Suppose a pigeon has already pecked ten times on a green key. Now, in order to earn its food reward, it must give either another twenty pecks on the green key or ten new pecks on a red key. Even though it could save itself ten pecks worth of effort by switching to the red key, the pigeon prefers to stick with the green key, so as not to waste the ten pecks that it has already sunk into this key.

Answer #3: Don’t be a mug

The first seller is, in effect, offering 15 mugs, whereas the second is offering 12 mugs for the same price. You would be crazy to go with the second seller. If you did so, you are showing the less is more effect (thinking you’re getting more value by getting fewer pristine mugs). Again this is a fallacy. Less is not more. More is more. The fallacy arises because people tend to average over the whole set when making their judgement. For example, in one study, participants guessed that a hamburger had 734 calories but that a hamburger plus three sticks of celery (the saddest Happy Meal I’ve ever seen) had only 619 calories (and, no, they didn’t think that eating a stick of celery burns calories).

And pigeons again show the same fallacy. When given the choice between a pea alone and a pea plus a piece of milo (a relatively unappetizing grain), pigeons choose the pea — unless they have been starved beforehand, in which case they go for the meal deal. Similarly, dogs will choose a piece of cheese over a piece of cheese plus a bonus carrot, and macaques will choose a grape over a grape plus a bonus green bean. It’s not that they hate the milo, pea, carrot or green bean — they’ll eat it if that’s all that’s on offer — it’s just that pigeons, dogs and monkeys, like humans, sometimes think that less is more.

How did you do overall? Did you beat the pigeons? Probably not. The point of these studies was to show that pigeons show the same logical fallacies that are known to be widespread in humans. Why do we share these fallacies? Nobody knows for certain, but Thomas Zentall, who published a few papers that summarized these studies (and inspired another), has some suggestions. If an animal places more value on food that it has had to work hard for (justification of effort), then that may motivate it to persist longer when looking for food. Sunk cost effects may arise from the fact that, once you’ve got a food source you’re relatively happy with, moving seems unnecessarily risky, and this conservatism spills over into choices where there is in fact no such risk. Less is more effectslook puzzling to humans, but remember that most animals can’t count (or, at least, not very well). This means that, often, the best they can do is judge the overall average quality of two rival sources of (mixed) food, rather than work it out piece by piece.

If you made the same choices as pigeons, try not to feel so bad. Darwin was right: when it comes to the differences between humans and other animals, everything is relative and everything is a relative: we are all part of one big family.

Excerpted from the new book Are You Smarter Than a Chimpanzee? by Ben Ambridge. Copyright © 2017 by Ben Ambridge. Reprinted by permission of Profile Books, Inc. All rights reserved.

BMW M9 Concept

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;f you are looking for a futuristic looking and very powerful car, then your quest ends with BMW M9 Concept. This car would have it all, from extravagant exterior design and very comfortable and well-equipped interior design to great engine performances and specifications. The BMW M9 will be a worthy addition to its already existing fleet of cars.

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ENGINE OF BMW M9

It is expected to come with either the V12 or V8 motor. Since the car is light, the pace has been increased and it also has an effective motor.

To give this car an edge over the others, the velocity has been increased to 320 kph. The predecessors had a motor of 4395 cc, but this model is expected to be more superior in this regard.

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EXTERIOR OF 2016 BMW M9

BMW M9 would have a very peculiar exterior design which would have only two doors and LED headlights and taillights. The car would also have somewhat combined futuristic and extravagant exterior design.

In addition to having only two doors, BMW M9 would also have only one seat row for the maximum of two passengers. The manufacturer would use leather materials for seats and upholstery thus making the car very comfortable. Also, the manufacturer would most surely use a lot of modern technologies, such as Bluetooth and SB connectivity.

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