Alzheimer’s and the link to applying deodorant.

spray-548167_1280

Most men put little to no effort into finding the best deodorants for their body, Smelling good certainly plays a vital role in our everyday affairs so does killing bacteria and reducing odor and sweat. But their is a myth that the aluminum from cans, can cause cancer.

The ability of metals from food or cookware to cause Alzheimer’s disease is a regular concern in the news. Here’s the evidence behind the presence of metals such as copper, zinc, iron and aluminium.

Can certain metals increase my risk of developing dementia?

At present, there is no strong evidence to support the fears that coming in to contact with metals through using equipment or through food or water increases your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

However, there are many other metals that are present naturally in the brain.

What does the research say?

The current research shows that there is likely to be a relationship between naturally-occurring metals and the development or progression of Alzheimer’s disease. But the evidence doesn’t yet show whether this relationship actually causes Alzheimer’s disease.

It is also unclear whether reducing metals in the brain via drugs or reducing our exposure would have any effect. These metals are essential to the healthy function of our brain, so further research into changes before or during disease development is also necessary to understand if reducing the amount in the brain would actually be beneficial.

Origin of the myth

The myth that deodorant causes cancer has been circulated via emails, on websites, and even in newspapers.  The story varies from source to source, but contains some or all of the following elements:

  • Aluminium-containing antiperspirants prevent toxins from being expelled by the body.  These toxins clog up lymph nodes around the armpits and breasts and cause breast cancer.
  • The aluminium in deodorants is absorbed by the skin. It affects the blood brain barrier and has been linked with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • The risk is higher for women who apply deodorant after shaving.  This is because nicks in the skin increase absorption of aluminium and other chemicals.

Metals and the body

Naturally-occurring metals and Alzheimer’s disease

Metals such as zinc, copper and iron are present naturally in our bodies. Small amounts of these metals are essential to keeping our brains and bodies working properly. They are involved in many different processes including energy production, the movement of oxygen and the creation and management of many important molecules in the body.

Metals within food

Along with these essential metals, there are other metals that we are exposed to through things such as food.

The body is able to tolerate these metals in small amounts by clearing through the kidneys. These include aluminium and lead, for example it has been shown that if they are not taken out by the kidneys through organ failure or by exposure to extremely high doses these metals are able to deposit in the brain.

These metals are known to cause negative effects in the brain and have been implicated in several neurological conditions.

Copper, zinc and iron

Copper has been the most extensively studied of the natural metals in the brain, but there have also been several studies on exposure to excess zinc and iron among others.

High levels of iron were first reported in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease in 1953. Since that time it has been shown that iron, as well as zinc and copper are associated with the hallmark Alzheimer’s proteins amyloid and tau in the brain.

These hallmark proteins appear as clumps called amyloid plaques and tau tangles in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s and are thought to cause damage.

Laboratory experiments using cells in a dish or animal models have shown that copper, zinc and iron can cause the development of these plaques and tangles. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean they cause disease.

Zinc has actually been shown to reduce the toxic effect of the amyloid plaques by changing the amyloid proteins into a shape that is less harmful to the brain.

Reactive oxygen species

Copper and iron, but not zinc, have also been implicated in the development of something called ‘reactive oxygen species’ (ROS) in the brain. These are oxygen molecules that have been altered by a chemical reaction. Increased levels are known to be damaging, contributing to cell ageing and death. This is why antioxidants, which can clear up these ROS, are thought to be beneficial to general health.

ROS are believed to be an early contributor to the mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease development. Increased levels have been seen in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s and toxic amyloid has been shown to increase ROS production.

Conversely, zinc has been shown to protect against ROS by binding to amyloid protein in the place of copper, which reduces the creation of these reactive oxygen species.

The management of the levels of these and other naturally occurring metals is very tightly controlled by the body. It includes many different molecules and disruption of these processes can occur for various reasons. It is not yet clear if the increase in metals seen in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s causes the disease. However, it does appear that there is a relationship between the naturally occurring metals and Alzheimer’s disease.

graphic1

Aluminium

In 1965, researchers found that rabbits injected with an extremely high dose of aluminium developed toxic tau tangles in their brains. This led to speculation that aluminium from cans, cookware, processed foods and even the water supply could be causing dementia. The ability of this high dose aluminium to induce tau tangles, increase amyloid levels and contribute to the development of plaques has been shown in laboratory experiments on animals.

Importantly, these results were only seen with extremely high exposures that far exceed the levels that can enter the body through food or potentially through contact with aluminium cookware.

Since this study was reported, much research has been done on the relationship of aluminium and Alzheimer’s disease. As yet no study or group of studies has been able to confirm that aluminium is involved in the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Aluminium is seen in the normal, healthy brain. It is not clear how aluminium is getting into the brain from the blood. The levels currently seen in peoples brains hasn’t been shown to be toxic but an ageing brain may be less able to process the aluminium. Although aluminium has been seen in amyloid plaques there is no solid evidence that aluminium is increased in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. No convincing relationship between amount of exposure or aluminium in the body and the development of Alzheimer’s disease has been established.

Aluminium in food and drink is in a form that is not easily absorbed in to the body. Hence the amount taken up is less than 1% of the amount present in food and drink. Most of the aluminium taken into the body is cleaned out by the kidneys. Studies of people who were treated with contaminated dialysis have shown an increase in the amount of aluminium in the brain. This was believed to be as a result of inadequately monitored dialysis which then led to encephalopathy related dementia. Methods of dialysis have since been improved and doctors are better able to predict and prevent this form of dementia.

One large recent study did find a potential role for high dose aluminium in drinking water in progressing Alzheimer’s disease for people who already have the disease.

However, multiple other small and large scale studies have failed to find a convincing causal association between aluminium exposure in humans and Alzheimer’s disease.

CMSRI-Infographic-4-Risk-Factors-for-Alzheimers-061317-Update

Treatments

The idea that metals could be contributing to Alzheimer’s disease has led researchers to study the effects of drugs which remove or inactivate metals in the brain on disease progression. To date, several different drugs have been trialled to see if they can remove excess copper or zinc from the brain or the amyloid plaques.

Many of these drugs have shown positive results in human trials on either reducing plaques and/or cognitive decline. However, as yet, none of these drugs have been approved for use in people due to significant side effects such as severe headaches, renal failure, or life threatening low calcium, among others. Research in to this potential treatment is ongoing.

Current evidence

The Journal of The National Cancer Institute published a study in 2002 exploring the relationship between breast cancers and antiperspirants or deodorants in 1606 women.  The findings did not show an increased risk of cancer amongst deodorant or antiperspirant users, or amongst women who shaved before using deodorant or antiperspirant.

Another small case control study, in 2006 found that 82% of the controls (women without breast cancer) and 52% of cases (women with breast cancer) used antiperspirants, indicating that using the under arm product might protect against breast cancer. While the study is too small to make such a claim, it certainly does not support the ‘antiperspirants cause cancer’ story.

Furthermore, antiperspirants work by aluminium salts blocking sweat glands, not lymph nodes.  Although lymph nodes do remove toxins, they do not remove them by sweating.  Most carcinogens are removed through the liver or kidneys and excreted out.  It is also pertinent to note that breast cancer starts in the breast and spreads to the lymph nodes, not the other way around.

Studies show that there is no relationship between antiperspirant use and Alzheimer’s disease. Humans are exposed to aluminium from food, packaging, pans, water, air and medicines.  From the aluminium we are exposed to, only minute amounts are absorbed, and these are usually excreted or harmlessly stored in bone.  At any one time, the average human body contains much less aluminium than an antacid tablet.  The Alzheimer’s Society states that the link between environmental Aluminium and Alzheimer’s disease seems increasingly unlikely.

Reputable organisations like the American National Cancer Institute, Cancer Research UK, the American Cancer Society and most other major authorities suggest the link between deodorant or antiperspirant use and breast cancer is unconfirmed, or simply a myth.

It is impossible to ignore when researching this question that the large majority of the research articulating the possible link between underarm cosmetics and breast cancer comes from one research group.  And it seems despite the absence of evidence to support the link, their search to prove the theory persists.

Summary

There is insufficient evidence to support the myth that applying deodorant or antiperspirant after shaving will increase the risk of cancer, as demonstrated by the 2002 study mentioned above. The American Cancer Society (ACS) states that the main risk related to using theses products is that they can cause skin irritation if a razor nick or cut is infected.

Could Drinking Alcohol Be Better For You Then Exercise And Help You Live Longer?

There are countless studies and articles out there that debate whether alcohol consumption is good for you or not, but I’m fairly certain nobody cares about the negative headlines and we simply choose to believe boozin’ is super healthy. I mean, at least that’s what I do.

If you, too, choose to believe alcohol is good for you, I have amazing news that will definitely justify your reasoning: New research revealed that booze has invigorating, anti-aging powers, and is actually one of the secrets to a long and prosperous life. This is some of the best news I’ve ever heard, so I’ll drink to that.

The research was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference, where neurologist Claudia Kawas presented the riveting scientific breakthrough that drinking two glasses of wine or beer a day can significantly reduce your risk of a premature death – and is even better for your health than exercising regularly. Hah! Take that, naysayers.

To determine this awesome conclusion, Kawas and her team analyzed data from a long-term study conducted at the UC Irvine’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, called the 90+ Study, which has been following old-timers who basically all lived to be historic landmarks since 2003, in order to find out which lifestyle practices are best for longevity.

The researchers concluded that people who drank two glasses of wine or beer a day saw an 18 percent drop in their risk of early death, whereas participants who exercised 15 to 45 minutes a day cut the same risk by only 11 percent. This suggests that alcohol is the actualsecret to a long life, and is probably what flows through the Fountain of Youth.

“I have no explanation for it, but I do firmly believe that modest drinking improves longevity,” Kawas said at the conference. Honestly, I don’t think we need any further explanation. I’m sold.

Remember: 2 is the magic number!

Remember: 2 is the magic number!

Now, if you’re questioning the unparalleled revitalizing powers of booze, let me reassure you that drinking is super healthy with a few examples of some of the oldest people I’ve ever heard of.

  • A super old dude named Mark Behrends lived until the ancient age of 110, claiming a delicious brewski every day at precisely 3 o’clock was the only medicine he ever needed.
  • Another old-timer named Agnes Fenton made it to 112 by drinking three Miller High Life beers and a shot of whiskey every day.
  • Yet another one of the oldest people ever was Pauline Spagnola, who passed away at 101, who literally said the secret to her longevity was “a lot of booze.” Her words, not mine.

It may sound like I totally made all of that up, but I didn’t. But just to be clear, I’m not saying to mummify yourself in alcohol, because that’s definitely not good for you. Everything in moderation, my friend.

Forget ‘survival of the fittest’ – the laziest will inherit the earth

Species which use the most energy in their daily lives die out quicker than less energetic animals, say evolutionary biologists

A study of over 300 species of molluscs that have lived and died in the Atlantic over the past five million years found that those with high metabolisms were the most likely to be extinct.
A study of over 300 species of molluscs that have lived and died in the Atlantic over the past five million years found that those with high metabolisms were the most likely to be extinct.

It is the perfect comeback for those who are admonished for not pulling their weight. Never mind that work is piling up, being lazy is a winning evolutionary strategy that postpones the extinction of the species.

That, at least, is one interpretation. Researchers who studied nearly 300 forms of mollusc that lived and died in the Atlantic over the past five million years found that a high metabolism predicted which species had gone the way of the dodo.

The sea snails, sea slugs, mussels and scallops which burned the most energy in their daily lives were more likely to have died out than their less energetic cousins, especially when they lived in small ocean habitats, the scientists found.

While the causes of extinction are varied and complex, the work points to a new link between the rate at which animals use energy to grow and maintain their body tissues and the length of time the species has on Earth.

“The lower the metabolic rate, the more likely the species you belong to will survive,” said Bruce Lieberman, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology who led the research at Kansas University. “Instead of ‘survival of the fittest’, maybe a better metaphor for the history of life is ‘survival of the laziest’, or at least ‘survival of the sluggish’.”

The scientists examined 299 species of gastropods, such as snails and slugs, and bivalves, including mussels and scallops, that lived in the Western Atlantic Ocean any time from the Pliocene more than five million years ago to the present day. When the researchers calculated resting metabolic rates for each species, they found that energy use differed markedly for the 178 species that had gone extinct compared with those that live on today. The work is published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

“The probable explanation is that things that were more sluggish or lazy had lower energy or food requirements and thus could make do with little when times were bad,” said Lieberman.

The work could help conservationists to better forecast which species are likely to die out first as global climate change hinders food production. The next step is to find out whether metabolism plays a role in the extinction rates of other animals, including those that live on land.

“This result doesn’t necessarily mean that lazy people are the fittest, because alas sometimes those lazy people are the ones that consume the most resources,” Lieberman added. “Humanity’s laziness, when it comes to trying to arrest the changes to the planet we are causing, may be the biggest peril our own species faces.

“But in a nutshell our work indicates that being sluggish can make you more likely to survive. So, here’s to a nap, after we solve our planet’s environmental crisis.”

Scientist Claim That Women With Big Butts Are Smarter And Healthier

butt4-01A recent study at Oxford University has yielded some interesting results surrounding the size of a woman’s behind. The results suggest that those women with larger butts saw lower risk of having some diseases. Researchers also published results suggesting that these women also tend to be smarter than other women. Let’s look into this a bit more.After studying the results of the test, researches concluded that women with bigger butts had a lower risk of developing diabetes, cardiac conditions and other diseases associated with cholesterol that is ingested and occurring in the body. The women with larger behinds in the study proved to have lower levels of cholesterol meaning that their hormones aided in the burning of sugar more rapidly.

These results left many readers scratching their heads in confusion. It turns out that these women have large reserves of Omega 3 Acids in their bodies. These components are known for helping with better brain function overall. These women benefit from having it naturally.

Konstantinos Manolopoulos, the leader of this study, spoke with reporters from ABC News and discussed the research results. This Greek Professor announced that women who have more fat on their behinds have higher cholesterol and glucose levels than their counterparts.

Leptin is a hormone in the body that helps to regulate weight loss and weight gain. A healthy amount of leptin allows women to sustain a regulated weight throughout the year. The research indicates that women with larger butts have more leptin in their bodies, allowing them to maintain their bodyweight without too much fluctuation. Adiponectin is another hormone released more in larger butts and can help to prevent diabetic issues.

The results from Oxford University have been replicated with very similar results. The Universities of California and Pittsburgh also concluded interesting findings about women with larger behinds. Findings indicate that women with larger butts and thinner waists can expect a longer life than their counterparts.

It turns out that having a big butt actually has some significant health benefits. This feature allows women’s bodies to produce and stores some important and vital minerals that increase the body’s overall health. Don’t let anyone make you feel bad for having a larger behind. You can rest assured that this bigger butt is helping to prevent some awful diseases.

Know someone who’s proud of their big behind? Send them this article and let them know how lucky they truly are!

Do Men with beer bellies get more women and live longer?

safe_image.php

Researchers conclude: Men with beer bellies get more women and live longer

With it being the height of summer, it’s no wonder so many people are spending so much time at the beach.

For some, this presents a chance to regret the copious amounts of beer they drank during winter …

It turns out women prefer men with more stomach, as opposed to those who are well defined or muscly.

Sounds ridiculous, right? Well, researchers at Yale University have proven as much in a new study, according to British newspaper the Daily Telegraph.

A man’s attractiveness can also be enhanced if he’s a bit older and has children, as per the same study. The researchers say this has nothing to do with an underlying ‘daddy complex’ and more to do with evolution.

What women want

The findings suggest that men already having children indicates to women that they are fertile, which increases their natural appeal. In addition, other studies have shown that men with decreasing testosterone levels (and therefore potentially increased fat mass) are less likely to suffer from heart attacks and prostate cancer.

The very same study appears to point towards the fact that more body fat means a man will focus more on his family. As a direct result of this combination, the chances of him finding another woman and subsequently leaving is lowered.

Becoming fatter after fatherhood due to decreasing testosterone levels may not fit the “macho” ideal, but it actually prolongs lives and strengthens immune systems, according to Richard Bribiescas, professor of anthropology and deputy provost at Yale University.

There is evidence that these men are less likely to suffer from heart attacks and prostate cancer, while a study in 2008 found that men with high metabolisms were around 50 per cent more likely to die in a given year than those whose bodies burned up less energy at rest.

Among the celebrities who have fathered children later in life is Robert De Niro
Among those to father children later in life are Robert De Niro, who had a child at 68, and Rod Stewart, who was 66 when his eighth child was born.

“Macho makes you sick,” said Prof Bribiescas. “The Hollywood image of the swaggering, dashing man dispatching bad guys and carrying the day conjures up a perception of indestructibility.

“While men are on average larger and physically stronger than women, men have a considerable weakness.

“We have a harder time fighting off infections and illness compared with women, and… men simply do not take care of themselves.

“This has a significant negative impact on the pace at which men age.”

Prof Bribiescas also argues that becoming more podgy makes dads more likely to invest their time in their children rather than looking for other women, while the increased levels of fat could make them more attractive to women.

“[One] effect of lower testosterone levels is loss of muscle mass and increases in fat mass,” Prof Bribiescas writes in his book How Men Age: What Evolution Reveals About Male Health and Mortality.

“This change in body composition not only causes men to shop for more comfortable trousers but also facilitates increased survivorship and, hypothetically, a hormonal milieu that would more effectively promote and support paternal investment.”

The research follows the “dad bod” trend, in which middle-aged men were praised for their doughy physiques.

However, a Cambridge University study last year found that women searching for a father for their children should choose long-distance runners, who traditionally have very low levels of fat, because they are more likely to have stronger sex drives and higher sperm counts.

Could Gingers become extinct due to climate change ?

Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair could die out if temperatures continue to Rise according to genetic scientists Redheads are becoming rarer and could be extinct in 100 years’ time.

Polar bears and Emperor penguins aren’t the only species under threat due to climate change.

Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair is an evolutionary response to cloudy skies and allows inhabitants to get as much Vitamin D as possible.

But if predictions of rising temperatures and blazing sunshine across the British Isles turn out to be correct, flaming red heads could cease to exist within centuries.

While only 1% to 2% of the world’s population are ginger, in the north of the UK, where the weather tends to be more gloomy, this number is much higher.

In Scotland 650,000 (about 13% of the population) have red hair and, according to a study carried out last year, 40% of those living in Edinburgh are thought to carry the red hair/blue eye gene.

In the North and West of the UK, 29% of the population are believed to have the gene.

Red hair is caused by a mutation in the MC1R gene. It’s also a recessive trait, so it takes both parents passing on a mutated version of the MC1R gene to produce a redheaded child. Because it’s a recessive trait, red hair can easily skip a generation. It can then reappear after skipping one or more generations if both parents, no matter their hair color, carry the red hair gene.

“I think the reason for light skin and red hair is that we do not get enough sun and we have to get all the Vitamin D we can.

“If the climate is changing and it is to become more cloudy or less cloudy then this will affect the gene.

“If it was to get less cloudy and there was more sun, then yes, there would be fewer people carrying the gene.”

Another leading scientist, who asked not to be named because of the theoretical nature of the work, said: “I think the regressive gene is slowly dying out. Red hair and blue eyes are not adapted to a warm climate.

“It is just a theory but the recessive gene may likely be lost. The recessive gene could be in danger.”

Can gin really ease hayfever symptoms?

gin-tonic-hayfever

For many, summer and drinking go hand-in-hand – it’s the season for pints in beer gardens and wine in the park.

The problem is, a lot of us are stuck ‘enjoying’ these drinks with red, puffy eyes and our noses streaming into our glasses, thanks to the ultimate killjoy, hay fever.

The seasoned hay fever sufferer will make sure they’re stocked up on anti-histamines way before pollen starts to fill the spring breeze, but what you might not know is how alcohol can affect hay fever, and which types are best for it.

How does alcohol affect hay fever?

It’s not actually the alcohol itself that affects your allergies, but rather different substances found in alcoholic drinks, containing histamine and sulphites, which cause the symptoms of hay fever.

According to Livestrong, histamine tightens lung muscles, relaxes muscles in blood vessels and speeds up muscle movement in the intestines, while also increasing mucus production and causing inflammation. Sound familiar?

High levels of histamine tend to be found in darker, fermented alcoholic drinks, like wine and beer, which means that for some sufferers as much as a few sips can bring on these symptoms.

Stay in the clear

While no alcohol is going to make your hay fever actively better, Asthma UK say there are drinks you can choose which will stop you from suffering more, namely clear alcohols like gin and vodka.

Gin does not naturally  contain any sulphites, and many vodkas are also clear of them, meaning a G&T or a vodka lemonade might be your best bet for a rooftop tipple. Given gin and tonic is practically the perfect summer drink, we can’t really complain.

Conversely, beer and wine both develop high levels of histamine in the fermentation process. A 2001 study conducted by the Auckland Allergy Clinic found that 22 out of 28 participants developed allergy-like symptoms after drinking a glass of wine.

Which drinks are particularly bad?

If you’re a champagne-loving hay fever sufferer, we’ve got some very bad news for you – there’s nothing as bad for your allergies in the world of food and drink than a glass of bubbly.

Champagne contains around 84mg of histamine per 125ml glass. When you compare that with the next worst, red wine, at 15mg for a large glass, you’ve got a pretty strong argument for saving the Moët for the winter months.

Beer varies significantly by type, but a typical lager is around 14mg, while white is significantly better for you.

Champagne is unfortunately the worse type of booze for hay fever sufferers
Champagne is unfortunately the worst type of booze for hay fever sufferers 

Will food affect my hay fever too?

Unfortunately the answer here is yes. Tofu, sauerkraut and cured meats are all particularly high in histamine, as well as blue cheese and parmesan.

Canned fish, aubergine, citrus fruits and ketchup are also all worth avoiding if you’re a particularly bad sufferer.

How’s the pollen count this year?

Not to bombard you with yet more bad news but, well, here’s some more bad news: Professor Stephen Durham, a professor of Allergy and Respiratory Medicine at Imperial College London told LBC earlier today that we can expect a particularly rough year when it comes to sneezing our brains out through our noses.

“The tree pollen season is starting later this season after the cold spring delayed germination. The warm weather is going to bring on high pollen counts,” he said.

“It seems that there’s been a sudden burst due to the warm weather and we get this late germination and pollen release at once.”

The foods that can ease hayfever symptoms

If you’re looking for foods and drinks that can actually help to soothe hayfever symptoms, then you’re in luck, as there are several – just not gin unfortunately!

Rather than simply being low in histamine, some foods are actually rich in antihistamines, which help to block or disrupt histamine receptors – this is why many people take antihistamine tablets for hayfever. Foods that are rich in flavonoids such as quercetin, vitamin C or beta-carotene can help to block histamine and reduce inflammation.

Our top anti-histamine foods include:

Garlic – this is a rich source of quercitin and helps to support the immune system

Ginger – this is a popular choice for reducing hayfever symptoms, whether as a tea or added to foods and smoothies

Onions – these are another good source of quercetin and vitamin C

Blueberries – this superfood is packed full of vitamin Cand quercetin

Nettle – you can buy this as a powder to add to smoothies or you could try nettle tea

A smoothie is a great way to get more of these natural anti-histamine foods into your diet. Try a delicious hayfever-blasting smoothie, containing blueberries, strawberries, honey and ginger.

%d bloggers like this: